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Greg Garrett

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  • In Conversation 2

    $19.95

    * Second volume of the In Conversation series * Insights into the art of listening from former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams and author Greg Garrett How is God speaking into our lives today? How do Christians discern what they’re being called to do? How do literature and culture intersect with the Scriptures and our tradition? And what might the work of the artist teach us about both spiritual practice and the vocational tasks of preaching and teaching? Be a fly on the wall and listen in as dear friends-one who happens to be the past Archbishop of Canterbury, the other, “one of the Episcopal Church’s most engaging evangelists” (Barbara Brown Taylor)-discuss their longtime passions and shared interests. In this new volume of the “In Conversation series,” Rowan Williams and Greg Garrett talk about friendship, the Church, the gift of great novels, the importance of Shakespeare, the art of writing poetry and fiction, the preaching event, engaging popular culture, the relationship between faith and politics, the practice of prayer, and the necessity of sacred community, modeling for us in the process both the vanishing art of conversation and an active engagement with faith, culture, and real life.

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  • Crossing Myself : A Story Of Spiritual Rebirth (Revised)

    $23.95

    Greg Garrett’s memoir was originally self-published in 2005, and he has recently updated it. The story of his (multiple) suicide attempts and his efforts to find his way out of a spiral of depression, this is an honest and deeply hopeful book that will speak to those who have come through depression and those who still struggle with it. Greg says: “This is the book that made Rowan Williams want to be my friend, and for that and many other things, I’ll always treasure it.”

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  • Prodigal : A Ragamuffin Story

    $17.99

    Jack Chisholm is on top of his game: lead pastor of a big church in a big city, thousands of members, a huge physical plant. His books sell millions of copies, and he is a public figure, sharing his life’s philosophy: ‘We have got to do better.’ He is also living a lie—nobody could be as holy as his congregants think he is, and like all of us, he has his share of faults, flaws, sins. When one of these comes to light, the board of deacons gives him a choice: walk away or be publicly shamed. They wouldn’t dare, he thinks. I mean too much to this church. So he laughs at them and refuses to even acknowledge what he has done. And they fire him, publicly, messily. Jack loses everything overnight: his church, his friends, his money, his reputation, and his family. His wife, Tracy, humiliated and disgusted with Jack’s recklessness and unwillingness to take responsibility, takes the church’s buy-out and their daughter Alison and goes into hiding. Jack has been a pastor his entire adult life. His only marketable skill—proclaiming the Word of the Lord—is now valueless. How to live? What to do? Take a minimum wage job? Give up? Kill himself? He falls into a bottle and hopes it all will blow over. At last, out of money, out of hope, the impossible happens. His father arrives to rescue him with these simple words: Come home. Thus begins Jack’s journey back . . . back to himself, back to hope, back to his Father.

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  • Stories From The Edge

    $25.00

    This is not a book about the stages of grief, or the 10 steps to overcoming it. In fact, it’s more about suffering in general than bereavement in particular. Garrett (The Gospel According to Hollywood) draws on a summer he spent doing clinical pastoral education-a kind of boot camp for hospital chaplains-to discuss age-old theodicy questions. The book challenges certain myths that American Christians have swallowed about God-e.g., that God is a transactional ATM who is obligated to dispense good things to the faithful, or that it’s Satan, not God, who makes rotten things happen. Some of these myths are eloquently debunked, while others-such as Americans’ persistent faith in consumerism and their ability to “buy” health and happiness-deserve more ink. Garrett scores points with the powerful stories of the hospital patients he prayed alongside as well as his own autobiographical discussions of dealing with severe depression. Christians who are looking for theologically nuanced ways of thinking about suffering can learn much from this brief book.

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